Symposium Update: online archive now available at live stream link

Online permanent archive available now: Thanks to all who attended the symposium in person, and the over 4300 more in 650 cities around the world who attended online. We have had many requests and questions for/about the online archive. It is now up at the Live Stream link:  http://www.totalwebcasting.com/view/?id=hcf . Click on presenter names to go directly to any individual presentation. Click on Documents to access available power points. Please share widely, but remember to give proper attribution to the speakers and their colleagues if that has been requested. 

We are pleased to make this permanent archive available for free, but we still have work we would like to do. We would like to translate the presentations into japanese and subtitle them so that the country under the most urgent duress from the Fukushima nuclear disaster will have greater and better access. To this end we ask that if you feel this is a service you appreciate, and that is useful to you and others, please consider donating toward our work on making it available to a greater audience. Even $5 from every person who views it would help go a long way towards making further translation possible.

Symposium 

UPDATE 3/7- Press conference:  There will be a press conference 1:00 pm on Monday, March 11 with US Navy Quartermasters (retired) Maurice Enis and Jaime Plym who both suffered radiation exposure and subsequent health damage while serving on the USS Ronald Reagan during a Fukushima aid and rescue mission. Enis and Plym will discuss the lawsuit they joined against the nuclear plant’s owner, Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), for misleading US officials about the extent of radiation released.

 

UPDATE 2/22: Students with valid ID now only $30 (includes attendance and lunch for both days). Students who have already bought tickets will be refunded the difference.

 

Update: Live stream link will be:

http://www.totalwebcasting.com/view/?id=hcf

We are very pleased to offer the live stream, and have gone great effort to have it done professionally to enable clear viewing and remote events. It will be free to all, but we ask that those who feel this was a valuable service consider making a donation through the Donate Now button on our website. If everyone who asked for and watches the live stream donated even just $5 it would help to pay for having it done by an expert team, and indexed and put back on line after as a permanent reference. Thanks for joining us from home, to those who cannot join us in person.

 

Updates: 8am event registration AND check-in time for ticket holders (please arrive early as the event will begin promptly at 9am). Because the event is being live streamed people who arrive late will not be seated while presenters are speaking. 

PLEASE REGISTER EARLY, before it sells out! 

Hotel information- see bottom of page

 

Symposium: The Medical and Ecological Consequences of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident l March 11-12, 2013

The New York Academy of Medicine, New York City, NY

A unique, two-day symposium at which an international panel of leading medical and biological scientists, nuclear engineers, and policy experts will make presentations on and discuss the bio-medical and ecological consequences of the Fukushima disaster, will be held at The New York Academy of Medicine on March 11-12, 2013, the second anniversary of the accident. The public is welcome.

A project of The Helen Caldicott Foundation, the symposium is being co-sponsored by Physicians for Social Responsibility.

Registration Information: Registration and check-in will begin at 8am on both days. Please arrive early to allow time for this. The event will begin promptly at 9am.

Registration in advance is $60. This includes attendance and lunch for both days. Please fill out the on-line form and choose the secure PayPal option to pay.

Students with a valid student ID: now only $30 (includes attendance and lunch for both days). Student ID must be presented at the door at check-in.

Registration at the door: $60 (includes attendance only for both days). A limited number of à la carte lunches may be available for purchase. As time for networking is limited, we encourage people to register in advance in order to take advantage of the complimentary lunch and use this time to speak with participants and other attendees.

Registration forms must be filled out completely and accurately in order to insure easy check-in. The registration process will generate an e-ticket. This ticket MUST be presented at the door. If you lose your ticket you must provide photo ID that matches your registration information.

Food preference: Vegetarian or non-Vegetarian. At the time of registration you MUST specify whether you are requesting a vegetarian or non-vegetarian meal. Your request will be valid for both days. You cannot request a vegetarian meal for one day but not the other.

 

 

 TO REGISTER AND PURCHASE TICKETS CLICK HERE

The Presenters:

The event will be chaired by Donald Louria, MD: Chairman Emeritus of the Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey.

Confirmed speakers include:

Dr. Tim Mousseau, Professor of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina – Chernobyl, Fukushima and Other Hot Places, Biological Consequences

Ken Buesseler, Marine Scientist, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute –Consequences for the Ocean of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

David Lochbaum, The Union of Concerned Scientists – Another Unsurprising Surprise

Dr. Wladimir Wertelecki, President of the Board, OMNI-Net Ukraine Child Development Programs (current). Professor of Biomedical Anthropology (Adjunct) Graduate Program in Biomedical Anthropology, State University of New York at Binghamton, NY (2011-). Former Chair of the Department of Medical Genetics and Birth Defects, University of South Alabama, 1974-2010 - Congenital Malformations in Rivne Polossia and the Chernobyl Accident

Dr. Marek Niedziela, Professor of Pediatrics, Poznan (Poland) University of Medical Sciences – Differential diagnosis of ultrasonographic thyroid lesions in children

Dr. Alexy Yablokov, Russian Academy of Sciences – Lessons from Chernobyl

Akio Matsumura, Founder of the Global Forum of Spiritual and Parliamentary Leaders – What did the World Learn from the Fukushima Accident?

Robert Alvarez, Senior Scholar, Institute for Policy Studies, formerly of DoE - Management of Spent Fuel Pools and Radioactive Waste

Arnie Gundersen, Nuclear Engineer, Fairewinds Associates – What Did They Know and When Did They Know It?

Dr. David Brenner, Higgins Professor Radiation Biophysics, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University – Mechanistic Models for Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Living Systems

Dr. Steven Wing, Associate Professor Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University North Carolina - Epidemiologic studies of radiation releases from nuclear facilities: Lessons past and present.

Steven Starr, Senior Scientist, Physicians for Social Responsibility, Clinical Laboratory Science Program Director, University of Missouri - The implications of the massive contamination of Japan with radioactive cesium

David Freeman, Engineer and Attorney, Former Chairman of TVA, Office of Science and Technology in charge of energy and the environment in the Johnson White House, and for 2 years under Nixon –The Rise and Fall of Nuclear Power

Dr. Ian Fairlie, Radiation Biologist and Independent Consultant on Radiation Risks, Former Scientific Secretary to UK Government’s Committee Examining Radiation Risks from Internal Emitters – The Nuclear Disaster at Fukushima: Nuclear Source Terms, Initial Health Effects

Andrew S. Kanter, MD MPH FACMI, Immediate Past-President of Physicians for Social Responsibility – Moderator, Health Effects Panel.

Dr. Hisako Sakiyama, Doctor of Medicine, Former Senior Researcher in National Institute Radiological Sciences, Member of Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigative Commission  - Risk Assessment of Low Dose Radiation in Japan; What Became Clear to The National Diet of Japan Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission

Dr. Herbert Abrams, Stanford University, Emeritus Professor Radiology, Stanford University, Member Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation Committee National Academy Sciences (BEIR V11)  - "The Hazards of Low-level Ionizing Radiation: Controversy and Evidence."

Kevin Kamps, Specialist in High Level Waste Management and Transportation, Beyond Nuclear – Seventy Years of Radioactive Risks in Japan and America

Joseph Mangano, Executive Director, Radiation and Public Health Project, speaking on a new article about increases in newborn hypothyroidism.

Mary Olson, Nuclear Information and Resource Service, Southeast - Gender Matters in the Atomic Age

Cindy Folkers, Radiation and Health Specialist, Beyond Nuclear - Post-Fukushima Food Monitoring

Hiroaki Koide, Master of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), Specialist of Radiation Safety and Control.  

Dr. Helen Caldicott, Founding President Physicians for Social Responsibility – The Nuclear Age and Future Generations

 

 TO REGISTER & PURCHASE TICKETS CLICK HERE

 

 

PROGRAM: March 11 and 12th 2013

The Japanese Prime Minister during the Fukushima crisis, Naoto Kan, will open the symposium with a special

videotaped message. He will be followed by another video message from Hiroaki Koide, Master of Nuclear
Engineering, Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), Specialist of Radiation Safety and Control.
Monday, March 11
9-9:15 Moderator Donald Louria, MD, Chairman Emeritus, Department of Preventive
Medicine and Community Health, University of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey
Session One: DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS OF ACCIDENT
9: 15-9: 30 Former Prime Minister of Japan, Naoto Kan (videotape)
Opening Address
**
9:30-9:45 Hiroaki Koide, Master of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University Research Reactor
Institute (KURRI), Specialist of Radiation Safety and Control.
**
9: 45-10:15 Arnie Gunderson, Nuclear Engineer, Fairewinds Associates
What Did They Know and When Did They Know it?
**
10:15-10:45 David Lochbaum, Union of Concerned Scientists
Another Unsurprising Surprise
**
10:45-11:15 Coffee
11:15-11:45 Hisako Sakiyama , Member of Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent
Investigation Commission
Risk Assessment of Low Dose Radiation in Japan: What Became Clear in the Diet Fukushima
Investigation Committee
**
11:45-12:15 Akio Matsumura, Global Forum for Parliamentary Leaders on Global Survival
What Did the World Learn from the Fukushima Accident?
**
12:15-1:15 Questions
1:15-2:15 Lunch
Session Two: THE MEDICAL AND ECOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES
2:15-2:45 Steven Starr, Clinical Laboratory Science Program, University of Missouri
The Implications of Massive Radiation Contamination of Japan with Radioactive Cesium
**
2:45-3:15 Timothy Mousseau, Department of Biological Sciences, University South Carolina
Chernobyl, Fukushima and Other Hot Places: Biological Implications
**
3:15-3:45 Ken Buesseler, Marine Scientist Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute,
Fukushima Ocean Impacts
3:45-4:15 Coffee
415-4.45 Marek Niedziela, Department of Pediatrics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences,
Poland (videotape)
Thyroid Pathology in Children with Particular Reference to Chernobyl and Fukushima
**
4:45-5:15 David Brenner, Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and
Surgeons. Columbia University,
Living with Uncertainty About Low Dose Radiation Risks
5:15-6:15 questions
TUESDAY, MARCH 12
Session Three: THE MEDICAL CONSEQUENCES OF BOTH THE CHERNOBYL AND
FUKUSHIMA CRISES AS THEY RELATE TO NORTH AMERICA
9:00-9:15 Session Chair: Andrew Kanter, Physicians for Social Responsibility.
9:15 -9:45 Alexey Yablokov, Russian Academy of Sciences,
Lessons from Chernobyl
9:45-10:15 Wladimir Wertelecki, Department of Medical Genetics .University South Alabama
Congenital Malformations in Rivne, Polossia Associated with the Chernobyl Accident
**
10:15-10:45 Ian Fairlie, Radiation Biologist and Independent Consultant
The Nuclear Disaster at Fukushima: Nuclear Source Terms, Initial Health Effects
10:45-11:15 Coffee
11: 15-11:45 Steve Wing, Gillings School of Public Health, University North Carolina
Epidemiological Studies of Radiation Releases from Nuclear Facilities: Lessons Past and
Present
**
11:45-12:00 Joe Mangano, Radiation and Public Health Project,
Post Fukushima Increases in Newborn Hypothyroidism on the West Coast of USA
**
12:00 -12:30 Robert Alvarez, Institute for Policy Studies,
Management of Spent Fuel Pools and Radioactive Waste
12:30-1:30 Questions
1:30:-2:30 Lunch
2:30 -2: 45 Cindy Folkers, Beyond Nuclear, Post-Fukushima Food Monitoring in the US
2.45-3.00 Mary Olson, Nuclear Information and Resource Services Gender Matters in the
Atomic Age
3.00-3.30 Kevin Kamps, Beyond Nuclear Seventy Years of Radioactive Risks in Japan and
America
**
3:30-4.00 Coffee
**
4:00-4.30 David Freeman, Former Chair. Tennessee Valley Authority
My Experience with Nuclear Power
**
4:30-5.00 Herbert Abrams, Stanford University School of Medicine
The Hazards of Low Level Ionizing Radiation: Controversy and Evidence
5:00-6.00 Questions
6:00-6:30 Helen Caldicott Closing Remarks

 

PROGRAM: March 11 and 12th, 2013

The Japanese Prime Minister during the Fukushima crisis, Naoto Kan, will open the symposium with a special videotaped message: My Experiences as Prime Minister during the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster. He will be followed by another video message from Hiroaki Koide, Master of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), Specialist of Radiation Safety and Control: Fukushima Daiichi, A Chronological Account of the Disaster

Monday, March 11

9-9:15 Moderator Donald Louria, MD, Chairman Emeritus, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey 

Session One: DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS OF ACCIDENT 

9: 15-9:30 Former Prime Minister of Japan, Naoto Kan (videotape) 

Opening Address

**

9:30-9:45 Hiroaki Koide, Master of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), Specialist of Radiation Safety and Control. (videotape)

Fukushima Daiichi: A Chronological Account of the Disaster

** 

9: 45-10:15 Arnie Gundersen, Nuclear Engineer, Fairewinds Associates

What Did They Know and When Did They Know it? 

** 

10:15-10:45 David Lochbaum, Union of Concerned Scientists

Another Unsurprising Surprise 

** 

10:45-11:15 Coffee

**

11:15-11:45 Hisako Sakiyama , Member of Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission

Risk Assessment of Low Dose Radiation in Japan: What Became Clear in the Diet Fukushima Investigation Committee

 ** 

11:45-12:15 Akio Matsumura, Founder of the Global Forum of Spiritual and Parliamentary Leaders 

What Did the World Learn from the Fukushima Accident?

 ** 

12:15-1:00 Questions 

**

1pm-1:30pm Press conference:  There will be a press conference with US Navy Quartermasters (retired) Maurice Enis and Jaime Plym who both suffered radiation exposure and subsequent health damage while serving on the USS Ronald Reagan during a Fukushima aid and rescue mission. Over 150 participants in the mission are reported to have since developed tumors, tremors, internal bleeding, hair loss and other health problems they attribute to radiation exposure.  Enis and Plym will discuss the lawsuit they joined against the nuclear plant’s owner, Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), for misleading US officials about the extent of radiation released.

**

1:15-2:15 Lunch

 

Session Two: THE MEDICAL AND ECOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES

 

2:15-2:45 Steven Starr, Clinical Laboratory Science Program, University of Missouri 

The Implications of Massive Radiation Contamination of Japan with Radioactive Cesium

 **

 2:45-3:15 Timothy Mousseau, Department of Biological Sciences, University South Carolina 

Chernobyl, Fukushima and Other Hot Places: Biological Implications 

** 

3:15-3:45 Ken Buesseler, Marine Scientist Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, 

Fukushima Ocean Impacts

** 

3:45-4:15 Coffee

** 

415-4.45 Marek Niedziela, Department of Pediatrics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland (videotape) 

Differential diagnosis of ultrasonographic thyroid lesions in children

** 

4:45-5:15 David Brenner, Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons. Columbia University,

 Living with Uncertainty About Low Dose Radiation Risks

 **

5:15-6:15 questions

 

TUESDAY, MARCH 12

 

Session Three: THE MEDICAL CONSEQUENCES OF BOTH THE CHERNOBYL AND

 

FUKUSHIMA CRISES AS THEY RELATE TO NORTH AMERICA

 

9:00-9:15 Session Chair: Andrew Kanter, Physicians for Social Responsibility.

 

9:15 -9:45 Alexey Yablokov, Russian Academy of Sciences, 

Lessons from Chernobyl

 

9:45-10:15 Wladimir Wertelecki, Former Chair, Department of Medical Genetics University South Alabama 

Congenital Malformations in Rivne, Polossia Associated with the Chernobyl Accident 

**

10:15-10:45 Ian Fairlie, Radiation Biologist and Independent Consultant

The Nuclear Disaster at Fukushima: Nuclear Source Terms, Initial Health Effects

 **

10:45-11:15 Coffee

 **

11: 15-11:45 Steve Wing, Gillings School of Public Health, University North Carolina

Epidemiological Studies of Radiation Releases from Nuclear Facilities: Lessons Past and Present

 ** 

11:45-12:00 Joe Mangano, Radiation and Public Health Project,

Post Fukushima Increases in Newborn Hypothyroidism on the West Coast of USA

 **

 12:00 -12:30 Robert Alvarez, Institute for Policy Studies, 

Management of Spent Fuel Pools and Radioactive Waste

** 

12:30-1:30 Questions

1:30:-2:30 Lunch

**

2:30 -2: 45 Cindy Folkers, Beyond Nuclear,

Post-Fukushima Food Monitoring in the US

**

2.45-3.00 Mary Olson, Nuclear Information and Resource Services

Gender Matters in the Atomic Age

**

3.00-3.30 Kevin Kamps, Specialist in High Level Waste Management and Transportation, Beyond Nuclear.

Seventy Years of Radioactive Risks in Japan and America

 **

 3:30-4.00 Coffee

 **

4:00-4.30 David Freeman, Former Chair, Tennessee Valley Authority 

My Experience with Nuclear Power

 **

4:30-5.00 Herbert Abrams, Stanford University School of Medicine 

The Hazards of Low Level Ionizing Radiation: Controversy and Evidence

** 

5:00-6.00 Questions

** 

6:00-6:30 Helen Caldicott Closing Remarks

 

 TO REGISTER AND PURCHASE TICKETS CLICK HERE

 

Location: The New York Academy of Medicine.

 

The New York Academy of Medicine is located at 1216 Fifth Avenue, at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 103rd Street. The entrance is on 103rd Street.

More specific directions, including Google Map, can be found on-line at:http://www.nyam.org/events/plan-your-event/general-info/location-directions.html 

 

How to get there:

By Subway

Take the #6 local train to 103rd Street. Walk west on 103rd Street; after crossing Park Avenue, turn right and walk a few yards, and then turn left onto the path through the garden of Carver Houses to Madison Avenue. Continue west on 103rd Street almost to Fifth Avenue. The entrance to the Academy is on 103rd Street.

From 42nd Street/Times Square. Take Shuttle Train to 42nd / Street Grand Central and transfer to the #6 Train (Uptown) to 103rd Street.

Transit information from HopStop »

By Bus

From south of 103rd Street. On Madison Avenue, take a northbound M1, M2, M3, or M4 bus to 103rd Street. Walk west on 103rd Street almost to Fifth Avenue. The entrance to the Academy is on 103rd Street.

From north of 103rd Street. On Fifth Avenue, take a southbound M1, M2, M3, or M4 bus to 103rd Street. The entrance to the Academy is on 103rd Street, on the southeast corner of the intersection of 103rd Street and Fifth Avenue.

From Grand Central Station/Grand Central Terminal. Exit Grand Central Station and Terminal on 42nd Street at Vanderbilt Avenue. Walk one short block west to Madison Avenue and take the M1, M2, M3 or M4 (Northbound) bus 103rd Street. Walk west on 103rd Street almost to Fifth Avenue. The entrance to the Academy is on 103rd Street.

From Metro North/125th Street and Park Avenue. Exit the station and take the M101 bus on Lexington Avenue southbound to East 102nd Street. Walk three blocks east to Fifth Avenue and proceed north to 103rd Street.

From Port Authority Bus Terminal. Exit the terminal at the West 42nd Street exit. Proceed to Eighth Avenue and take the M42 Bus east to Madison Avenue. Transfer to the M1, M2, M3 or M4 (Northbound) bus 103rd Street. Walk west on 103rd Street almost to Fifth Avenue. The entrance to the Academy is on 103rd Street.

From Pennsylvania Station. Exit the terminal at the West 33rd Street exit. Proceed to Eighth Avenue and take the M42 Bus east to Madison Avenue. Transfer to the M1, M2, M3 or M4 (Northbound) bus 103rd Street. Walk west on 103rd Street almost to Fifth Avenue. The entrance to the Academy is on 103rd Street.

Transit information from HopStop »

By Car

From south of 96th Street. From the FDR Drive North, take the 96th Street exit. Turn left onto 96th Street, and drive straight until Madison Avenue. Turn right on Madison, and drive north to 103rd Street. Turn left, and the Academy is at the end of the block on the south side of the street.

 

From north of 96th Street. From the FDR Drive South, take the 96th Street exit. Turn right onto E. 96th Street, and drive straight until Madison Avenue. Turn right on Madison, and drive north to 103rd Street. Turn left, and the Academy is at the end of the block on the south side of the street.

Directions on Google Maps»

From Area Airports

From LaGuardia Airport. The Academy is located 7.5 miles from LaGuardia Aiport. From the Main Terminal, take the Parkway West ramp towards Manhattan. Merge onto the Grand Central Parkway west (the Grand Central Parkway becomes I-278 East). Take the exit towards Manhattan/Randalls-Wards Island/Downing Stadium. Merge onto the Triboro Bridge. Merge onto the FDR Drive South. Take exit number 15, towards East 106th Street. Turn right onto East 106th Street, and proceed to Fifth Avenue. Turn left onto Fifth Avenue and continue until 103rd Street.

 

From John F. Kennedy International Airport. The Academy is located 17.5 miles from JFK Airport. From all terminals, follow signs to the Van Wyck Expressway (I-678 North). Merge onto the Grand Central Parkway West via exit number 10 (on the left), following signs to the Triboro Bridge. Take the exit towards Manhattan/Randalls-Wards Island/Downing Stadium. Merge onto the Triboro Bridge. Merge onto the FDR Drive South. Take exit number 15, towards East 106th Street. Turn right onto East 106th Street and proceed to Fifth Avenue. Turn left onto Fifth Avenue and continue until 103rd Street.

 

From Newark International Airport. The Academy is located 21.7 miles from Newark Airport. From the Main Terminal follow directions to US-1&9 North. Merge onto the New Jersey Turnpike North (I-95N) towards exits 16E-18E (US 46-Lincoln Tunnel). Take Route 3 exit number 16E in the direction of the Lincoln Tunnel. Merge onto I-495 East. Proceed through the Lincoln Tunnel. Take the exit on the left toward 10th Avenue/Points North/West Side Hwy. Stay straight to go onto Dyer Avenue. Turn left onto West 42nd Street. Turn right onto the West Side Hwy (NY 9AN/12th Avenue). Continue to follow NY9A North. Take West 96th Street Exit. Turn slight right onto West 96th Street. West 96th Street becomes 97th Street. 97th Street then becomes East 96th Street. Proceed on 96th Street to Madison Avenue; turn left onto Madison Avenue and proceed to East 103rd Street. Turn left onto East 103rd Street.

Directions on Google Maps»

Parking

Merit Parking 107th Street (between Fifth and Madison Avenues)
Telephone: 212-722-9498. 
Cost: $15 up to 12 hours; $22 up to 24 hours
(prices subject to change; please call ahead to verify price)

Glenwood 334 East 103rd Street. 
212-369-0764

Standard parking 86 East 99th Street (Park and Madison). 
212-241-5661

East 105th St. Parking 156 E. 105 Street. 
212-534-7619

 

 TO REGISTER AND PURCHASE TICKETS CLICK HERE


Hotels 

The closest Hotels to the New York Academy of Medicine are:

 

Courtyard New York Manhattan/Upper East Side

410 East 92nd Street · New York, New York 10128 USA

http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/nycmh-courtyard-new-york-manhattan-upper-east-side/

 

The Hotel Wales 

1295 Madison Avenue (between 92nd & 93rd), New York, NY 10128. Local 212.876.6000. Toll-Free 1.866.925.3746

http://www.hotelwalesnyc.com 

They are both within walking distance of the venue. They are also the most expensive.

 

Other Hotels will be considerably less expensive. See list below (the list was chosen for relative affordability- please look up the hotel you choose to make sure it will be suitable to your requirements and expectations).

 

Remember that check-in and registration for the event (this includes ticket holders) will begin at 8am sharp which means that the farther from the venue you stay the more likely you will be to need to take the subway to reach the venue on time as it will be rush hour and cabs will be delayed in traffic. The subway in NY is quick, safe, and inexpensive, and very easy to navigate.

 

Morningside Inn

www.morningsideinn-ny.com

235 West 107th Street

Private rooms from $85

 

West Side YMCA

www.ymcanyc.org/westside

5 West 63rd Street

Private rooms from $100

 

Holiday Inn Midtown 57th Street

http://www.holidayinn.com/hotels/us/en/new-york-city/nycup/hoteldetail

440 West 57th Street

Private rooms from $172

 

Stay Inn NYC

www.stayhotelny.com/

157 West 47th Street

Private rooms from $205

 

Vanderbilt YMCA

http://www.ymcanyc.org/association/guest-rooms/vanderbiltrooms

224 East 47th Street

Private rooms with shared bath from $105, private rooms with private bath from $160

 

AWA New York Downtown Hotel

http://www.hostelbookers.com/hostels/usa/new-york-city/78627/

765 8th Avenue at West 47th Street

Private rooms with private baths from $74

 

Holiday Inn Express Fifth Avenue

http://www.hiexpress.com/hotels/us/en/new-york/nycff/hoteldetail?cm_mmc=mdpr-_-googlemaps-_-ex-_-nycff

15 West 45th Street

Private rooms from $204

 

Seton Hotel

www.setonhotelny.com

144 East 40th Street

Private rooms from $189

 

Holiday Inn Midtown

http://www.holidayinn.com/hotels/us/en/new-york-city/nychi/hoteldetail

30-32 West 31st Street

Private rooms from $194

 

Holiday Inn

http://www.holidayinn.com/hotels/us/en/new-york-city/nycvc/hoteldetail

125 West 26th Street

Private rooms from $215

 

HOSTELS BY LOCATION

 

Jazz on the Park hostel

http://www.jazzhostels.com/jazzonthepark.php

36 West 106th Street

Dorm rooms with shared bath from $37.50, private rooms from $62.50 (some with private baths, some with shared baths)

 

Hostelling International New York

http://www.hinewyork.org/

891 Amsterdam Avenue at West 104th Street

Dorm rooms with shared bath from $55, private rooms not available March 10 & 11

 

Royal Park Hotel & Hostel

www.royalparkhotelnyc.com/

258 W 97th Street

Private rooms with shared bath from $89, private rooms with private bath from $112

 

New York Budget Inn

34th Street and 3rd Avenue

http://www.newyorkbudgetinn.com/

Dorm rooms with shared bath from $50, private rooms with private bath from $80

 

Chelsea International Hostel

http://www.chelseahostel.com/

251 West 20th Street

Dorm rooms with shared bath from $55, private rooms with shared bath from $120 and with private bath from $140

 

Larchmont Hotel in Greenwich Village

http://www.larchmonthotel.com/

It is located in a nice area of Greenwich Village on 11th St. between 5th and 6th Ave. They have free Wi-fi and also breakfast.

 

Leo House at 332 W. 23rd St, New York, NY 10011

http://www.leohousenyc.org/

 

____________________________

 

Mt Sinai Hospital, which is right down the street from the venue, also has a list of recommended Hotels:

http://www.mountsinai.org/about-us/visiting-us/accommodations

 

Aloft (on the Mt Sinai list), is on the Upper West Side but must be near a crosstown street to have made the Mt Sinai list.

Rooms start at $179- 1 bed & $189- 2 beds.

 

Please look up what ever hotel you choose and make sure it is acceptable to you. We have compiled a list, but cannot verify that any individual hotel may be exactly what you are looking for. There are comprehensive reviews of almost every NYC hotel. Please research before booking. Read the reviews, and decide accordingly.

NY is not an inexpensive city, and for the best rates you can also check internet sites like Lonely Planet, Rough Guide, Kayak, Orbitz, Expedia, Travelocity, etc.  Many also have air/hotel combos that can be more affordable.

 

For further information about the symposium, contact: Mali Lightfoot, Executive Director, The Helen Caldicott Foundation.

Email: MaliLightfoot@gmail.com, t) 617-650-5048


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Nuclear Power is not the Answer